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Lower back ache/pain?

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NamonsterIcon...22-01-2010 @ 08:15 
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always trolling for a reaction
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nathan said:from reading this topic if i was owen i would be s**tting myself

love the positiveness

just to recap owen

in two weeks ull be in a wheel chair and 6 months time u wont be able to get out ur bed

hope that answers everything


I read that somewhere too.
luke00Icon...22-01-2010 @ 08:21 
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For goodness sakeRoll-Eyes It's simple if you are that worried see a physio, none of us on here are experts but IMO it will be nothing too serious. But yeah cancer and a wheelchair are definate possibilityGrin
PintIcon...22-01-2010 @ 08:38 
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Just a thought... If your lower back pain is to one side or the other (rather than central) it is often caused by HAMSTRINGS rather than actual back injury ....Bear with me!!!

When squatting or deadlifting, there is a lot of pressure on the hamstrings, these generally loosen when excercising so there is no real pain in training, but when the hamstrings tighten up after training stops, they shorten. This causes a pull across the lower back. If this is the case you will find it hard to lean forward (imagine reaching over the bath to put on the taps) without putting a hand down to support yourself.

Not trying to diagnose anyone, but back pain is often caused by hamstrings tightening - it is well worth checking this out with your physio or GP. Hamstring stretches before and after training are often helpfulWink
CuddlesIcon...22-01-2010 @ 08:57 
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nathan said:from reading this topic if i was owen i would be s**tting myself

love the positiveness

just to recap owen

in two weeks ull be in a wheel chair and 6 months time u wont be able to get out ur bed

hope that answers everything


Come on dude, the advice of seeing an expert is pretty f**king sensible, not negative, sensible.
nathanIcon...22-01-2010 @ 09:10 
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no longer sugdens strongest man
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Pint said:Just a thought... If your lower back pain is to one side or the other (rather than central) it is often caused by HAMSTRINGS rather than actual back injury ....Bear with me!!!

When squatting or deadlifting, there is a lot of pressure on the hamstrings, these generally loosen when excercising so there is no real pain in training, but when the hamstrings tighten up after training stops, they shorten. This causes a pull across the lower back. If this is the case you will find it hard to lean forward (imagine reaching over the bath to put on the taps) without putting a hand down to support yourself.

Not trying to diagnose anyone, but back pain is often caused by hamstrings tightening - it is well worth checking this out with your physio or GP. Hamstring stretches before and after training are often helpfulWink


thats what u cal a sensible post
b_rexIcon...22-01-2010 @ 10:22 
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Pint said:Just a thought... If your lower back pain is to one side or the other (rather than central) it is often caused by HAMSTRINGS rather than actual back injury ....Bear with me!!!

When squatting or deadlifting, there is a lot of pressure on the hamstrings, these generally loosen when excercising so there is no real pain in training, but when the hamstrings tighten up after training stops, they shorten. This causes a pull across the lower back. If this is the case you will find it hard to lean forward (imagine reaching over the bath to put on the taps) without putting a hand down to support yourself.

Not trying to diagnose anyone, but back pain is often caused by hamstrings tightening - it is well worth checking this out with your physio or GP. Hamstring stretches before and after training are often helpfulWink


There is some truth to this, but in many cases it is not caused by tight hamstrings as such, but by tight hip flexors. Check your posture - if you are walking around with your arse pushed back and a big arch in your low back, you have anterior pelvic tilt caused by tight hip flexors and spinal erectors. Your hip tilts forward, which pulls on your hamstrings and makes them seem inflexible and stiff. Stretching your hamstrings just makes the pelvic tilt worse. I hvave APT and it was giving me some jip earlier in the year. I found that daily stretching of my hip flexors and plenty of foam rolling of my flexors, IT band and adductors really helped within 2-3 weeks.
OwenIcon...22-01-2010 @ 16:38 
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lol yeah cancer, thanks Grin

But anyway, yeah its too the left of my back mate. So that seems pretty sensible idea.
Just do the usual stretches yeah? What stretches hip flexors though?
OwenIcon...22-01-2010 @ 16:39 
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Oh and i bike to work - doesnt biking shorten them?
b_rexIcon...22-01-2010 @ 16:44 
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Post Edited: 22.01.2010 @ 16:44 PM by b_rex
Yeah biking will shorten them because you're almost always in hip flexion. The leaning forward will also fatigue the spinal erectors.

To stretch the hip flexors, hold a lunge position for time. If you turn your chest towards the opposite leg, it will increase the stretch. Likewise, you can raise your arms overhead to increase the stretch.
OwenIcon...22-01-2010 @ 16:54 
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Seems to fit the bill tbh mate. Loose when excersising, tight after sitting. Ill get stretching.
b_rexIcon...22-01-2010 @ 16:57 
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Look into doing some glute activation drills before you train as well:

Stretch your hips
Do some glute mobility drills (e.g. bird dogs, glute bridges)
Train
Tom_MartinIcon...22-01-2010 @ 17:43 
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someone mentioned not stretching your hamstrings to solve anterior pelvic tilt. I wouldn't reccomend this. IMO the answer is continued work on hamstring flexibility, and a lot of work on lower back and hip flexor flexibility.

Your hamstrings almost certainly are not too flexible, not stretching them will just continue to shorten them, and if you're lucky you'll be forced into a better pelvic allignment (but this is unlikely, your shorter hamstrings will pull be pulling the back of your pelvis, your tight hip flexors and tight lower back will be pulling the pelvis around the opposite direction and you're back will be very sore) This will then get worse when you try and squat/deadlift whatever. everything will be so solid and jammed up then when you get to the bottom of a squat or deadlift, your shortened hamstrings will pull you into a really rounded lower back position, and then your lower back pain will get worse.

So carry on stretching your hamstrings, and do tonnes of flexibility/foam rolling work on your hip flexors and back. Forcing your pelvis into position by shortening muscles is a BAD IDEA!
mikeypIcon...22-01-2010 @ 20:38 
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b_rex said:
There is some truth to this, but in many cases it is not caused by tight hamstrings as such, but by tight hip flexors. Check your posture - if you are walking around with your arse pushed back and a big arch in your low back, you have anterior pelvic tilt caused by tight hip flexors and spinal erectors. Your hip tilts forward, which pulls on your hamstrings and makes them seem inflexible and stiff. Stretching your hamstrings just makes the pelvic tilt worse. I hvave APT and it was giving me some jip earlier in the year. I found that daily stretching of my hip flexors and plenty of foam rolling of my flexors, IT band and adductors really helped within 2-3 weeks.


Great advice here, I suffer from this and need to really work on stretching, I find it feels great after training but find it really boring on non training days. I think its my adductors and hip flexors which are tight, how do you roll the adductors on the foam roller?, interesting you also roll the ITB.
WesIcon...22-01-2010 @ 21:00 
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Stretching has definately helped with my lower back pain, it's still there but its a hell of a lot better, it'll probably never go completely as its the nature of the sport.

I just chuck in a stretch or 2 for 30 secs when I'm just standing around, like waiting for the kids to come out of school (my kids not random one's) !!!
PintIcon...23-01-2010 @ 09:22 
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Wes said:

I just chuck in a stretch or 2 for 30 secs when I'm just standing around, like waiting for the kids to come out of school (my kids not random one's) !!!


LOL!! Good recovery!Tongue

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